Introduction

Bandit corydoras is a tropical freshwater fish which is also known as masked corydoras, bandit catfish or Meta River corydoras. It belongs to the family Callichthyidae under order Siluriformes of Class Actinopterygii. It originates in inland waters of South America and is found in the Meta River basin in Colombia. It prefers pH, hardness and temperature which range from 6.0 – 8.0 pH, 2 – 25 dGH and 72 -79 °F respectively.

Bandit Corydoras’s Overview

It has light whitish body with a pink tinge. The body has black band on both sides of the head that runs vertically over its eye like musk and another stripe which runs horizontally from the dorsal fin to the tail. All the fins are colorless with the exception of the dorsal fin. The bottom two-thirds to one half of the dorsal fin is black while the remainder part is colorless. They also have very sharp pectoral fin spines. Females have a rounder body while the males are a little smaller. Two pairs of sensory barbells are present at the tip of mouth and the fish uses these to locate potential food items. In the wild they typically feed on small worms, benthic crustaceans, insects and decaying animal and plant matters. The fish can grow up to 5 cm in length. It can live up to 5 years. Overall it is a very peaceful species that will be right species at home in a peaceful community aquarium with other smaller peaceful fish species.

Scientific Name: Corydoras metae

Common Name: Bandit Catfish, Bandit Cory, Masked Cory, Meta River Catfish, Rio Meta Cory, Meta River corydoras

Origin: Colombia

Adult Size: 2 inches (5 cm)

Behavior: Peaceful

Tank Level: Bottom dweller

Minimum Tank Size:  10 gallons

Diet: Omnivore

Breeding: Egg layer

Care level: Easy to intermediate

Water pH: 6.5-7.0

Water Hardness: 5-10 dGH

Water Temperature: 72-79 0F

Water Movement: Normal-moderate

Lighting:  Moderate – normal lighting

Lifespan:  5 years

Background of Bandit Corydoras

Bandit corydoras was originally described by Carl H. Eigenmann in 1914. It is an armoured catfish which possess two rows of bony plates instead of scales running along the flanks. The genus name is composed of the Greek words cory, meaning helmet and doras, meaning skin. The body has black bands which consist of a vertical stripe through the eye that gives the popular name ‘Bandit catfish’. The species ‘metae’ was named after Rio Meta, the river where it was first found.

Housing Bandit Corydoras

The bandit corydoras requires at least 20 gallons aquarium but larger is recommended. They are extremely peaceful and schooling fish which should be kept in groups of at least 3-6 fish or more. Temperature of the tank water should be maintained 72-79 0F because corydoras gets easily stressed by cooler temperatures. They are also sensitive to poorly maintained or dirty substrates and can lose their barbells if they are kept in poor conditions. The water should be soft, pH in the range of 6.5 to 7.0 and hardness in the range of 5-10 dGH.

Corydoras can be kept in most community and planted aquariums with fish like tetras, danios, rasboras, livebearers, Guppies, Mollies, Platies, Swordtails, Tetras, Barbs Discus, Angelfish, Gouramis, Rainbow fish and Plecos. Tank should be decorated with broad-leaf plants and crevices under rocks or other ornaments for hiding places as well as some open areas for swimming room. A few dried leaves are essential to mimic their natural habitat. Substrate with sharp or jagged edges should be avoided because that can irritate and damage their undersides and barbells. In this case fine or sandy substrates are best. The water should be filtered through peat and 50 % of the tank water needs to replace at least once a month. The lighting should not be too bright.

Bandit Corydoras and Feeding

It is omnivorous fish and in wild condition, it feeds wide variety of foods such as worms, benthic crustaceans, insects, and plant matter. They also eat any dead, dying or even injured fish. In captive condition it should be supplemented with live and frozen foods such as Daphnia, Artemia and bloodworm. It is a bottom dweller and it eats most food which sinks to the bottom of the tank. Sinking algae pellets with flake food or other sinking foods like catfish pellets should be offered to ensure proper nutrition.

Feeding Bandit Corydoras

It is omnivorous fish and in wild condition, it feeds wide variety of foods such as worms, benthic crustaceans, insects, and plant matter. They also eat any dead, dying or even injured fish. In captive condition it should be supplemented with live and frozen foods such as Daphnia, Artemia and bloodworm. It is a bottom dweller and it eats most food which sinks to the bottom of the tank. Sinking algae pellets with flake food or other sinking foods like catfish pellets should be offered to ensure proper nutrition.

Sexing Bandit Corydoras

Bandit Corydoras is easy to sex when it is viewed from above. The female is much rounder and wider than the male.  The male is smaller overall than the female in size. The ventral fins of the mature male are more pointed than those of the female.

Bandit Corydoras for Sale

The Bandit Corydoras aren’t an easy fish to find for sale. They are typically sold from breeders or imported into the country. Looking for where to buy some Bandit Corydoras? Check out below for some recommendation of online vendors selling these fish.

Previous articleTinfoil Barb Information
Next articleBetta Fish Information
I'm not the greatest writer in the world but I like to educate people on how to setup and maintain a beautiful shrimp tank that friends and family will be envious about. It's a great hobby and takes a bit of knowledge but once you get it down - it seriously beats looking at a screensaver of fishes!